Can We Train Fascia?

What’s This Research About?

Dr. Schleip is interested in the molecular, biomechanical, and neurophysiological traits of fascia. The authors review the foundational makeup of fascia and recommend practical exercises to train strong and resilient tissue. Dr. Schleip believes that training fascia in these ways will make it less prone to injury.

TITLE: Training principles for fascial connective tissues: Scientific foundation and suggested practical applications.


PUBLICATION: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

DATE: 2012

AUTHORS : Robert Schleip, Divo Gitta Muller

Fascia: The definition of fascia continually evolves with increasing research. Robert Schleip describes it as a “body wide tensional network which consists of all fibrous collagenous soft connective tissues.” The continuous network envelops and connects all muscles and organs. As research continues, it becomes clear that fascia comes in a variety of different densities, shapes, striations, and architectures due to all of the different tensional strains that are put on the tissue.

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By | 2018-01-05T15:26:23+00:00 December 26th, 2017|Musculoskeletal, Other Exercises, Stretching|0 Comments

About the Author:

Catherine brings to her role as a personal trainer a wealth of education and years of athletic experience with training in track and cross country running, gymnastics and rowing, boxing and yoga. She received a B.A. in Sports Medicine and Exercise Physiology from the University of San Francisco and an M.A. in Kinesiology at San Francisco State University. She also holds certifications in ACE, FMS I and II, PRI (Myokinematics, Respiration), Neuromuscular therapy, FRCms, and FR. As an athlete she sustained several injuries, which led her on the path to study and understand the body and the mechanisms of healing. "I was fascinated with everything I learned. Throughout college, I worked with USF athletes as an athletic trainer in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries. Soon I was able to transfer all of this knowledge into helping everyday people with their aches and pains." Her thirst for knowledge is never quenched and she continues to evolve her practice to stay up to date on the latest research and methods to help her clients with present injuries, pain, and best ways to acquire strength to maintain a healthy body. "I believe assessment is still key in starting with clients but stability, global strength and everyday movement are key to people's longevity, and quality of life. If people can slowly and systematically expose their bodies to different loads to gain strength and mobility they will better succeed to get the most out of their bodies." Learn more about Catherine Cowey.